Millennials Matter: Go And Make Discipling Leaders

Day 3 of 8 • This day’s reading

Devotional

 Mentoring Determination  


One of the negative reputations millennials have is that they lack resiliency. They start a project enthusiastically, but give up as soon as they meet an obstacle. Failure can be catastrophic and debilitating for some.


Experts say that the problem comes from too many participation awards for just showing up. Or, from parents who act more like peers than parents, not letting their children fail and thereby learn how to pick themselves back up. This is in contrast to a healthier parenting where there is strong accountability with high standards, coupled with a strong support system and encouragement.


At its root, the inability to be resilient is due to a lack of the character trait of determination.


Determination is the character quality that is needed to fuel resoluteness as millennials face modern-day challenges to forward momentum and faith. How do we teach young leaders to run in such a way as to get the prize?


Share stories. Think about times when you tackled a difficult task or faith challenge. What kept you moving forward?



  • Reflect on the principles, skills, and mind-sets you’ve developed over the years. 

  • Tell them your story, authentically. Be willing to talk about your fears and failures, what motivated you to push through discouragement, and how your faith matured. 

  • Ask your millennial leader how your experiences might apply to their current life or faith challenge. Then listen and ask questions to understand their perspectives. 


Workout the determination muscle. How do we guide them to build that muscle? Over the next thirty days, encourage them to daily or regularly:



  • go to the gym to build physical strength, which can help power mental, emotional, and spiritual strength

  • find a way to get the Word of God on a regular basis, whether with a Bible text, a YouVersion, or notes on a mirror

  • discover a way to pray that works with how they are particularly wired, such as popcorn prayer, prayer-jogging, or prayer-journaling

  • talk with you about their faith challenges and ask questions


All of these stretch current comfort zones. Thus, they include victories to celebrate. When your young leader, your Joshua, gets knocked down or stumbles, encourage them to get back on track and pray with them. As you help them, ask for their help in supporting you as you run your own race of faith. Help build resiliency and the character trait of determination.