[All Things Series] We the People

Day 1 of 3 • This day’s reading

Devotional

We the People Can Grow Closer


Under stay at home orders, we have all realized how much we long for connection and human interaction. This situation is a little bit more comfortable for introverts. However, there is still something in all of us that, amid the impossibility of in-person connection and interaction, forces us to discover how much we long for them. Zoom calls are all right, and church online is fantastic, and yet there is something we miss about the fellowship of the saints and connecting with people. 


God has put a desire to connect in all of us. But what happens when a pandemic forcedly changes the dynamics of our relationships? A different social circumstance can reveal the problems and frail relationships that are usually hidden behind our busyness. 


Changes can lead to tensions in our homes. We forget, for example, that our number one goal with our children at home is not algebra, history, or science. Our priority is connecting with our children to nurture them in a healthy and loving way. We need to allow peace to reign in our homes, to prioritize the person over the activity. 


The letter to the church in Philippi is a loving and encouraging message to brothers and sisters written by the Apostle Paul from prison. The dynamic he finds himself in is applicable to the one we have been describing. Paul, far from his beloved friends, longs for connection, and finds out that there are problems within the church. There is a yearning in Paul’s heart for closeness, healing, and growth within the church. 


Paul exhorts two sisters, Euodia and Syntyche, to agree in the Lord, settle their disagreement, and stay true to the Lord (Philippians 4:1–2). The dynamic in the relationship between these two women changed. They used to contend together for the gospel with Paul, but now that Paul is distant in chains, tension between them arose, revealing underlying problems. He calls another partner in the faith, Syzygus, to help these women. The healing of their relationship was of the utmost importance. It came before their work for the gospel. 


Today, I invite you to pause and think about how changes in your family dynamics may have revealed wounds, frailty, or difficulties. Take this time as an opportunity to draw closer, heal, grow, and thrive in all of your relationships in the Lord. Let us not only survive this pandemic, but thrive. May the Lord heal His people in all things.