Jesus Day By Day: A 5-Day YouVersion By Sharon Kaselonis

Day 1 of 5 • This day’s reading

Devotional

Jesus in the Beginning


Jesus’s first appearance in the Bible is in Genesis 1, at the very beginning of Scripture. In the beginning God created. He created simply by speaking. God spoke and it was. In creation He revealed to us the power of His word and introduced us to His Son!


God said, “Let us make man in our image” (Genesis 1:26). Here we find the first reference to the Holy Trinity. Jesus is here in the “us.” Jesus, God the Son, who holds the creator rights, has been from the beginning.


We see Jesus again in Genesis 3, when mankind first rebelled against God. Adam and Eve had everything anyone could ever dream of, but then they sinned. The Bible says that because of Adam’s sin, all mankind was born into sin (Romans 5:12). But God, who is rich in mercy, provided a remedy in the form of a redeemer who would take the punishment for sin—the sin of the whole world. That redeemer is promised right here in Genesis 3:15.


Jesus Christ is the seed of Eve, the one who would crush the head of the serpent. Because of Christ’s atoning work through His death and resurrection, we are no longer under the curse of sin but are instead children of God. We are joint heirs with Christ, and our Enemy has been defeated!


God saw Adam and Even in their exposed state of sin and divinely provided them coverings from a sacrifice (Genesis 3:21). Those animal skins pointed to God’s ultimate sacrifice, His promised remedy—Jesus Christ.


God’s grace covered Adam and Eve. This is good news for us, friend, because that same grace covers you and me. The blood of Jesus washes us clean. He covers our every sin, and we are clothed in Christ’s righteousness (Revelation 19:8). So as you start a new day, no matter your situation, remember that God keeps His promises. He provided a redeemer who crushed the head of Satan, and that redeemer—your redeemer—lives! He is God’s promised remedy.


Why is it significant that Jesus existed at the time of Creation and Adam and Eve’s rebellion? What difference does that make in our own stories of redemption?