Introduction
The letter written to Titus, along with 1 and 2 Timothy, is one of the three letters that came to be called “Pastoral Letters” because each addresses the central problematic issues church leaders faced as the earliest Christian churches moved more and more toward greater organization and interconnection. Titus, like Timothy, had been an associate of Paul and had traveled with him on mission journeys through Asia Minor and Greece. He was completely of Gentile background in coming to faith in Christ. The large Greek island of Crete was one of the places he had visited with Paul, and Titus was asked by Paul to stay on there and take charge of the organizing of churches in Crete's cities and of choosing and appointing leaders for those churches. This letter provides Titus with guidelines for selecting leaders and for the virtues they will need to model for their churches. As in the other pastoral letters, there are also strong warnings against the dangers of false teachings and of divisions within the churches. As with 1 and 2 Timothy, the letter's concern over church organization matters (a concern that only became crucial in the era following Paul's death) has led some to suggest that Titus was likely written by a disciple of Paul claiming the apostle's authority.
Outline
Church Leaders and False Teachers (1.1-16)
What to Believe and How to Live Rightly as God's People (2.1—3.15)
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